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Make Water WorkMake Water Work
Most of our residential water is used on lawns and gardens. Unfortunately, much of this water evaporates before it can benefit grass and plants. When we water in the hot sun, as much as half of the water is lost to evaporation.

Just the simple act of watering in the cool of the evening makes every drop count.

Find simple ways to Make Water Work best on your lawn and garden!

Feel free to download and print the posters here and post them in your workplace. Let’s all MAKE WATER WORK!


Download Poster (PDF)

Download Poster (PDF)

Download Poster (PDF)

 

Find our Make Water Work radio ads here:


Radio ad #1: Don’t mow. Let it grow.
(Leave grass 2-3 inches tall. Water stays longer when grass is longer.)


Radio ad #2: Water plants, not pavement.
(Water where it’s needed. Save time, money, and water.)


Radio ad #3: Put water on the nightshift.
(Water between 10 pm and 6 am to prevent evaporation.)


Radio ad #4: Pair water with plants suitable to our dry climate.
(Change out some lawn to drought-tolerant turf and/or native and low-water variety plants.)

 

Don't Move a Mussel - Stop Invasive Aquatic Hitchhikers
Aquatic Invasive Species are non-native plants and animals introduced to a lake, river, creek, wetland or other water body.  Without natural enemies to control their spread, these species out-compete native plants and animals for food and space.  They harm water quality and can impact human health. Once they get a foothold in an area, it is often impossible to eradicate them, requiring costly ongoing treatment.

Learn more about efforts to keep the Okanagan invasive mussel free at www.dontmoveamussel.ca.

Don't Move a MusselDownload Kids Activity Sheets, Rack Cards, and Fact Sheets here.

Radio ad #1: Our water quality is at risk


Radio ad #2: Our beaches are at risk


Radio ad #3: Our fish are at risk


 

Slow It. Spread It. Sink It.Slow it. Spread it. Sink it!
The Slow it. Spread it. Sink it! An Okanagan Homeowner’s Guide to Using Rain as a Resource is an easy-to-use guidebook, showing local residents how they can easily capture and re-use the water that falls on their property.

There are many reasons for collecting and using rainwater.  First, the water that comes out of our taps has been cleaned and treated at great cost to your water provider – and you, the taxpayer. Using treated water on our gardens, and for other non-consumptive purposes, is not money well-spent.  As more and more communities adopt the use of water meters, and we start paying for the amount of water we use, saving water will mean saving money.

Climate change studies suggest that, in addition to the potential for drought, the Okanagan will also experience periods of extreme rains.  Heavy rains can cause damage, washing debris into our storm sewers, affecting water quality, which in turn can affect the fish, the wildlife, and the people who rely on these waters.

It makes sense then, to collect the water that falls on our properties. The goal is to: Slow it down instead of speeding it through pipes and into the lakes; Spread it out across the properties instead of funneling it into storm sewers, and; Sink it back into the ground, recharging our groundwater supplies, and naturally filtering it before the water finds its way back into our streams and lakes.

Find the Slow it. Spread it. Sink it! (7MB PDF) here.

 

Okanagan Waterscape PosterThe Okanagan Basin Waterscape Poster
The Okanagan Basin Waterscape Poster was created as a water education tool. This detailed and colourful poster illustrates topics of major importance to water resources in the Okanagan, including groundwater, domestic water use, and the effects of climate change and population growth. Copies of the poster are available by calling us in Kelowna, B.C. at 250-469-6271.

Download the poster (38MB PDF) from Geoscape Canada

Unraveling the Myth of Abundance:
A Teacher's Guide to the Okanagan Basin Waterscape Poster


Get to know your H2O!
These activity sheets were created by the BC Water & Waste Association – an Okanagan WaterWise partner – as part of BC Drinking Water Week.

 

 

Learn more about water in the Okanagan and tips to protect it at Okanagan WaterWise.

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